DJ Tinc gives beginners special tips about how to get started on a DJ Console! If you would love to see more of such tutorials, give the video a thumbs up and fire away in the comments section if you would like DJ Tinc to answer your questions.

DJ Tinc: Beginner’s Spinning Tips

Name
TINC
Musician
Published
31.08.2016

TINC is currently a DJ/Producer based in Singapore with a crowd-pleasing audio repertoire and has skyrocketed into the local and international club scene. Having played shows in New York, Chicago, Melbourne, Taipei, Manila, Myanmar, Thailand and Cambodia just to name a few.


THE INTERVIEW

Stepping foot into Zouk, which is one of the top clubs in Singapore, many would imagine the life of a DJ would be filled with glam and glitz in every aspect. Hence, Chiobu Collective was very much surprised when the crew arrived at DJ Tinc’s new studio located at a small industrial building near Clementex Road.

With well­ recognised beats of club music accompanying the cosiness of the space, everyone had no problem getting comfortable and exploring Tinc’s new hideout. Two DJ consoles seen neatly tucked in a room by the corridor, whereas the main room was furnished with a sofa for two, and a few potted plants to accompany the sunlight streaming in through the windows.

As with many others who were seldom in front of the camera, during Tinc’s first few moments of hosting her Spinning Tips for Beginners video, Chiobu Collective observed Tinc’s voice trembling, and her hands fumbled slightly even on the familiar knobs on her DJ console. However, as the music blasted through the speakers with each passing second, she eventually surrendered her fears to the rhythm of the track.
The DJ’s mind channelled into the confidence she had deep within; until she effectively engaged with viewers behind the camera; akin to interacting with her audience with behind the DJ console every night, with a glint in her eye.
After the shoot, Chiobu Collective took the chance to sit down with Tinc and chat about her journey as a DJ.

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Q: What got you into music?

A: I was a musician since I was six, I started writing since I was fifteen; so DJing is another segment of music I decided to explore when I first entered the club. I was very intrigued and decided to pick it up. I didn’t know that I would go this far, but I did. So I find it very interesting to infuse electronic music with live music.

Q: How do people normally react when they hear that you are a DJ?

A: They normally go like, “Oh is it fun? It’s so cool! I wish I had your job!” etc. Apparently for a lot of people, being a DJ is one of their wish lists to be! It’s nice that I got to pursue it, because while a lot of people want to do it, they don’t know how to go about doing. I am just lucky to find the right path to do the things I like.

I got a monthly residency at Zouk which is kind of a big deal. Zouk never used to have a monthly residency for female DJs. Before they got bought over by Genting, the club was very selective and had a tight quality control of their DJs. Maybe one of the reasons why Zouk don’t have female DJs is because they wouldn’t want others to have a wrong impression marketing wise. Secondly, it is very difficult to find a female DJ. It’s not like there’s a lot scattered waiting for you to pick up anyways. How I got in was that I got scouted over to do a Trap and Hip Hop night for another zouk resident who was already there. It was a very huge honour for me because I am probably the only female DJ who got a monthly residency to work with the resident DJs there.

To me, I am a musician. I have never once given up on music. I will be always doing music all my life. That is a given, I know for sure.

Q: Were there any stereotypes that you faced in such a male dominated industry?
When you walk into the club and up to the console, all you see are guys surrounding you; the sound engineer, the technician, and even the opening and closing sets are all guys. I have experienced situations where the guy DJs just seem to stand right next to me anticipating me to make a mistake to help rectify it but I never did.

In fact, sometimes it’s the other way around where I have to help the guys rectify their mistakes. To me, this situation is very normal, and I don’t blame anyone for this. In fact, I see it as self­respecting; to do well so as to not get judged easily. I do my best and help others around me. One thing I don’t like about the industry is that people are always waiting to watch you fall.
It’s only fair that you give people a chance to prove themselves before judging them. What is the point of giving someone the stink eye just as they walk up to the console? If that person makes one mistake, it’s still ok. But if he makes multiple mistakes in one night, then I’ll say something.

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Q: Are there times when you feel challenged so much that you thought about giving up?

A: To me, I am a musician. I have never once given up on music. I will be always doing music all my life. That is a given, I know for sure. I did have doubts about me DJing for the rest of my life. I can be a producer next time making music behind the scenes. DJ is a lifestyle, it’s like getting to travel, getting to drink, getting to party. But realistically, that might not be the lifestyle I want ten years down the road. I may not be doing DJ ten years down the road so I try to focus on my music and not the life shows. Instead of doing festivals, I can do concerts. It is a slight shift in lifestyle.

Q: Previously you mentioned that ChiobuTV gives artists a chance for them to interact personally with viewers. How do you think ChiobuTV can come in to give artists a better leverage in the Singapore’s industry?

A: I don’t feel that we need to justify ourselves to others. If people already think that we aren’t good enough, no matter what we say, it is very hard to change their mindset. The only way is to empower what we already have, and already supporting us to continue supporting us but stronger. Haters will keep hating no matter what; the better you are, the more they hate. The video is targeting our current supporters, and future supporters that this is what we are doing behind the scenes, this is what we go through in our lives. We hope that they acknowledge that this female community exists, open up more opportunities, and not shutting down future opportunities.

Q: How do you think ChiobuTV can help fight this stereotype?
For starters, ChiobuTV goes in depth behind the scenes where artists like me have an opportunity to interact with me personally. On stage, I interact with a lot of people and it is difficult to have a one to one connection. With ChiobuTV, we get to foster that personal connection with viewers, so that’s a very good approach for people to understand me as a person. I’m not just a DJ you see, I’m also a human being who has the drive and passion to achieve a dream so it is for them to understand the reason for me to become a DJ.

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Q: Previously you mentioned that a lot of people envy you being a DJ. So what are some of the challenges that you face being a female DJ that people don’t know?

A: I expected a lot of obstacles especially as a female because DJ is a very male dominated industry. I expected it, but I don’t take it negatively. In fact, it gives me even more energy to prove them wrong. The satisfaction is there when I get to prove other people wrong. Normally, all it takes is one mistake to depict your entire night or career. Every start of the week you have to be careful, but to have fun as well. Basically the toughest is when people talk about you behind your back and you learn how to overcome that overtime. You just ignore and do your thing.

Other difficulties would be more technical or knowledge based, which definitely can be studied at home, and practiced in a studio.

Q: Are there times when you feel challenged so much that you thought about giving up?

A: To me, I am a musician. I have never once given up on music. I will be always doing music all my life. That is a given, I know for sure. I did have doubts about me DJing for the rest of my life. I can be a producer next time making music behind the scenes. DJ is a lifestyle, it’s like getting to travel, getting to drink, getting to party. But realistically, that might not be the lifestyle I want ten years down the road. I may not be doing DJ ten years down the road so I try to focus on my music and not the life shows. Instead of doing festivals, I can do concerts. It is a slight shift in lifestyle.

Q: Previously you mentioned that ChiobuTV gives artists a chance for them to interact personally with viewers. How do you think ChiobuTV can come in to give artists a better leverage in the Singapore’s industry?

A: I don’t feel that we need to justify ourselves to others. If people already think that we aren’t good enough, no matter what we say, it is very hard to change their mindset. The only way is to empower what we already have, and already supporting us to continue supporting us but stronger. Haters will keep hating no matter what; the better you are, the more they hate. The video is targeting our current supporters, and future supporters that this is what we are doing behind the scenes, this is what we go through in our lives.

We hope that they acknowledge that this female community exists, open up more opportunities, and not shutting down future opportunities.